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2016 K-League Kits Reimagined: Part 1

Following in line with the Six Things K-League Can Learn From MLS series, our Incheon and Jeonnam columnists Marc-Élie Guay and Ryan Walters took on the challenge of reimagining all 12 K-Leauge Classic kits under a single brand. After considering several options, Adidas was chosen as the lone kit provider mainly for aesthetic reasons, but also because they already have a foothold in the league sponsoring Suwon Bluewings and Ulsan Hyundai in Classic. Additionally, Adidas is the sole provider for MLS, and therefore creates a more consistent comparison between the leagues. The challenge included following the basic kit format and rules of the Adidas brand and keeping all current kit sponsors. As tempting as it was to have Cass Fresh as the sponsor for a team, they had to keep all sponsors as they stand in the 2016 season. Additionally, each designer tried to keep in line with the branding each team is known for. For example, the iconic black and red bars of FC Seoul's home kit remained in place. Creative leeway was given, but within reason.

Mainly taken on as a design project, the notion of a single kit provider for K-League could also show potential financial benefits. According to Last Word on Sports, the current Adidas deal with MLS is roughly worth $200 million, or $25 million per season. K-League definitely wouldn't see that kind of money, but the opportunity to have league-wide sponsorship in stadia and on kits may well be an appealing one for a brand like Adidas. To get an idea of what the league might look like under this single brand, here in Part 1 we'll be taking a look at the away kits for all 12 Classic teams.


What do you think? Love em? Hate em? Have a favorite? We'd love to hear your thoughts about the reimagined away kits in the comments below, or you can join the conversation on Twitter @KLeagueUnited
Or contact the artists directly @H1ZUMI@MrRyanWalters.

4 comments

  1. Just to reiterate what I said on Twitter, that Seoul kit with the subtle Namsam tower is really good work. Must've missed the Pohang one on first viewing, but I quite like the horizontal stripes/half-hoops as well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Seoul kit is brilliant and I like the Pohang one also. I am a sucker for black though. Really dig the Jeju strip.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ever since GS blatantly ripped off the brilliant Our City banner performance by Incheon fans, any silhouette associated with them is automatically distasteful.

    ReplyDelete

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